Sixty percent of new managers fail within their first two years — here are some useful tips on how to tackle the challenges in front of you and come out on top. 

Most people strive for that coveted management position thinking they will do a great job, but more often than not they get surprised by the amount of work waiting for them at the very top. So instead of succeeding, they set themselves up for failure; this is why it is imperative to be prepared and have a few aces up your sleeve. Sixty percent of new managers fail within their first two years — here are some useful tips on how to tackle the challenges in front of you and come out on top.

1. Learn how to provide constructive feedback.

This is one of the key management skills that can make or break your team as well as your career. Being able to provide the much-needed feedback in such a manner so as to motivate your team instead of criticizing them can make all the difference when it comes to the quality of their performance.

The biggest mistake most managers make is thinking how they themselves would act in a given situation, instead of taking the skills of the team into consideration — what their strength and weakness are, and using the former while helping them overcome the latter. Just take into consideration that 69 percent of employees say they would work harder if they felt their efforts were being better recognized, and things fall into place.

On the other hand, it is just as important to learn how to receive feedback; getting defensive or angry is not constructive, nor will it lead to betterment. The more effective approach is to listen to pre-provided feedback and see what you can implement in order to improve on your own management skills and practices.

2. Make sure your team feels appreciated.

In today’s job market, it’s is all about finding and retaining the right talent. And whether or not you get to keep your most productive members does not solely depend on how much you pay them; it also involves how they feel at work, whether or not their voice is heard, and if they feel appreciated enough.

A recent survey showed that 39 percent of employees feel underappreciated at work — no small number. A good manager knows how to spot a dissatisfied team member and act on it immediately, thus guaranteeing quality talent retention. One of the ways to help your team feel appreciated is a reward system so they can feel that all their hard work is being noticed. You can opt for different types of rewards, from additional vacation days to a universal gift card as a part of the office holiday gift package. This type of extra attention to details will result in increased satisfaction of your team members as well as higher productivity levels, one of the most important factors of success.

3. Stay on top of new technologies

Being able to implement new management tools can significantly increase your own productivity levels as well as the ones of your team. It is important to follow current trends and spot the options that can make the biggest difference when it comes to whether you succeed or fail as a manager. Sometimes you will have the freedom to choose the tools that best suit your task list, but more often than not, your company will provide you with the ones you need to utilize. And it is the speed with which you can adapt to the new technologies that will determine your success. It would be wise to keep track of all the project management software currently used in your company, as well as the new ones coming out. That way you’ll know what to expect and the adjustment process won’t take as long.

There you have it, three simple-to-follow yet effective tips that will help you succeed in your efforts to become a successful manager. All that is left is to implement them the right way and see the results. Don’t forget, you need to be flexible and adjust your way of doing things in order to get the most from your team.

Keith Coppersmith

Keith Coppersmith is a business and marketing expert who has experienced both the rise and fall of many businesses. He enjoys writing and providing insight based on both practice and theory.

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